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Keynote Lectures

Keynote Lecture
Dieter Bimberg, Bimberg Chinese-German Center for Green Photonics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, CIOMP and Center of Nanophotonics, TU Berlin, Germany

Keynote Lecture
Giuseppe Strangi, Case Western Reserve University, United States

Nanophotonics: An Enabling Tool for Basic Research and Technology
Romain Quidant, ETH Zürich, Switzerland

 

Keynote Lecture

Dieter Bimberg
Bimberg Chinese-German Center for Green Photonics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, CIOMP and Center of Nanophotonics, TU Berlin
Germany
 

Brief Bio
Dieter H. Bimberg is the Founding Director of the Center of Nanophotonics at TU Berlin and serves now as CEO of the new “Bimberg Chinese-German Center for Green Photonics” at CIOMP. He was chairman of the Department of Solid State Physics at TUB from 1991 to 2012. His research interests include the growth and physics of nanostructures and nanophotonic devices, ultrahigh speed and energy efficient photonic devices for information systems, like quantum dot based mode-locked lasers and DFB lasers and ultimate nanoflash memories based on quantum dots. He has authored more than 1500 papers, 61 patents, and 7 books resulting in more than 60,000 citations and a Hirsch factor of 111. His honors include the Russian State Prize in Science and Technology 2001, his election to the German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina in 2004, to the Russian Academy of Sciences in 2011, to the American Academy of Engineering in 2014, to the American Academy of Inventors 2016. He was elected as Fellow of the American Physical Society and IEEE in 2004 and 2010, respectively. He received the Max-Born-Award and Medal 2006, awarded jointly by IoP and DPG, the William Streifer Award of the Photonics Society of IEEE in 2010, the UNESCO Nanoscience Award and Medal 2012, Heinrich-Welker-Award 2015 and Nick Holonyak jr. Award of OSA in 2018. In 2019 he received the IEEE Nishizaza Award and Medal and in 2020 the Stern-Gerlach Medal of German Physical Society.


Abstract
Available Soon.



 

 

Keynote Lecture

Giuseppe Strangi
Case Western Reserve University
United States
 

Brief Bio
Available soon.


Abstract
Available soon.



 

 

Nanophotonics: An Enabling Tool for Basic Research and Technology

Romain Quidant
ETH Zürich
Switzerland
 

Brief Bio
Quidant received a PhD in Physics (2002) from the University of Dijon, in France. Right after defending his thesis, he joined ICFO as a postdoctoral researcher. This was the year of its creation and he got actively involved into the early developments of the Institute. In 2006, he was appointed junior Professor (tenure-track) and group leader of the Plasmon NanoOptics group at ICFO. In 2009, he became tenure Professor both at ICFO and ICREA (Catalan Institution for Research). After nearly 18 years at ICFO, in June 2020, he joined the Mechanical and Process Engineering department (D-MAVT) at ETH Zurich. Quidant is recipient of 5 ERC grants (StG2010, PoC2011, PoC2015, CoG2015 and SyG2021) and several international and national prizes (Fresnel2009, City of Barcelona 2010, International Commission for Optics 2012, National research Prize 2014, Banc Sabadell 2017). He also serves as the executive editor of ACSPhotonics (American Chemical Society).

The research of the Quidant’s group focuses on nano-optics, at the interface between Photonics and Nanotechnology. His team uexploits the unique optical properties of nanostructures as an enabling toolbox to design solutions to scientific and technological challenges, in a wide set of disciplines, from fundamental physics to biotechnology and medicine. This makes his research highly interdisciplinary and involved in both basic and applied research. The most fundamental part of its work is mainly directed towards enhanced light/matter interaction and optomechanics. From a more applied viewpoint, his team investigates news strategies to control light and heat at the nanometer scale for biomedical applications, including lab-on-a-chip technology and targeted hyperthermia and for reconfigurable planar optics.


Abstract
Twenty years of extensive research in the field of nanooptics have enabled us to considerably advance light control on the nanometer scale. Beyond the original peak of inflated expectation, the assets of nanooptics over other technologies, along with its limitations, became clearer. More recently, the field has entered into the slope of enlightenment in which its actual contribution to both basic research and novel technologies has been better identified. In this talk, following a general introduction on the main assets of nano-optics, we will review different aspects of our research where nano-optical resonators are used as an enabling technology that can benefit a wide range of scientific disciplines, all the way from reconfigurable planar optics to biotechnology.



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